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According to Arthur Wilson, Life of James I (1643), the eighteenth earl of Oxford

was of no reputation in his youth, being very debauched and riotous, and, having no means, maintained it by sordid and unworthy ways.
On 22 July 1611 Oxford's mother Elizabeth (the 17th earl's second wife) complained against John Hunt, Henry's second cousin and his "bedmate,"
who seduces her son into evil courses, leads him to extravagance, and prejudices him against her authority.
Calendar of State Papers Domestic, 1611-18, p. 62 (PRO SP14/65/49, 49.1).

On 18 March 1618 the following statement was made before the chief officers of the city of Venice:

The Earl of Oxford, Lord Chamberlain of Great Britain, happened during the carnival to be in his gondola with a young courtesan, a thing permissible at such a time, and he did not know the laws. The young woman and his servants have been made prisoners. [The English Ambassador] is much distressed as he knows that they have done nothing wrong, and he begs for their release. I add my intercession to his.
The Ambassador was told that the matter would be considered, and so he took his leave. This case is discussed and documented in Calendar of State Papers, Venetian, xv (1617-19), p. 175, and in G. B. Lorenzi (ed.), Leggi e memorie venete sulla prostituzione fino alla caduta della republica (Venice, 1870-72), pp. ____:

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